Friday, September 12, 2014

Reinvention



Blink:
re·tire·ment (noun) riˈtīrmənt/  The action of leaving one's job and ceasing to work; the act of ending your working/professional career. 

Boomers are now struggling to adjust to life after work.  Consequently a new coaching industry has emerged.  Consultants that help people progress via reinvention.
                                                                                                                                            
Read On:
Have you ever viewed any of the retirement advertisements on television – Fidelity, Wells Fargo and Voya Financial, to name a few?  They all address how individuals need to financially plan their futures so basically they do not outlive their savings.  They never speak to how retirees can use their time creatively beyond travel, playing golf, sitting by the pool, etc.  As a result, people are now hiring retirement coaches.  At fees starting at $50 per hour or packages ranging from $30,000 to $50,000 over a negotiated time frame, people can assess with the help of a professional coach what they can do with their unused wells of energy and productive time.  Anything from part-time work, humanitarian/charitable endeavors, artistic pursuits, etc.  Bottomline: People are learning that they not only need to plan their retirement financially, but they need to reinvent themselves to remain productive or accomplish other lifetime goals beyond work.

Retiring?  What are your reinvention plans?  


2 comments:

  1. Perhaps. AARP offers many of the same services, for free. Jus sayin'

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  2. Jimmy, are you implying that the services (like mine) are less valuable than their cost? I'm not trying to be defensive, but your feedback is very valuable to my initiatives.

    Thomas, do you happen to know how people feel about results they get through government programs, if there are any for this?

    My presumption is that it would be the equivalent of hiring an expert like me to unemployment office services. Of course, people tend to be more vested in services in which they invest, and so get more out of them.

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