Tuesday, April 2, 2013

Pottery 101



Blink:
Customer centricity, content marketing, engagement, connectivity, interactive, transmedia – blah, blah, blah.  Marketers are over processing due to the new world of Web 2.0.  It is real simple: There are buyers (clay) and sellers (potters).  As long as the clay consumes, the potters will market. 

Read On:
This much I know.  The buyers (clay) are more informed, because the sellers (potters) are posting excessive information to absorb on the go.  According to a recent post I read (The Three S Model for Content Success), people on average are bombarded with 3 thousand brand impressions per day, because the average attention span of an adult online is only 8 seconds! 

Why all the content?  Big Data!  The sellers (potters) in addition to preaching the features and benefits of their products or services now have the tools to engage and connect with their buyers (clay).   In the process, the sellers (potters) have accumulated countless bytes of data about their buyers (clay).  As I stated back in my January post Data Proliferation, marketers primary Big Data objective is to achieve customer centricity.  Consequently, they analyze the data to figure out how to enhance their buyers (clay) overall experience and number of purchases.  Then they develop content for their buyers (clay) to share – 51% of the best-in-class companies use social sharing tools (source: The Three S Model for Content Success). 

Visualize the sellers (potters) sitting in a room at their potter’s wheels, intensely pedaling away molding their buyers (clay) until they form a beautiful bowl that is ready for the kiln.

Are you ready for Pottery 101?


4 comments:

  1. From my view, the analogy is backwards. Marketers do not mold the buyers, but mold their message to fit the (perceived) needs of the buyer. That would make the SELLER the clay, and the buyer the pot. Or perhaps I'm just slow on the uptake...

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  2. I think I've graduated to Pottery 300 level :)

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  3. I must agree with Thomas. I think in the last decade, the role of potter and clay has switched. Buyers now know how to influence the product - and do so willingly.

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  4. Thank you everyone for you POV.

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