Wednesday, May 4, 2011

RAGD

Blink:

Do you know your carbon footprint? Better yet, for those reading this post that own dogs, do you know your pup’s waste pawprint? With over 77 million dogs in U.S. households, I recently discovered the RAGD site – Raise a Green Dog.

Read On:

One topic I have explored in the past has been America’s passion for pets, specifically dogs. Consequently, I take time out on a regular basis to find out what is going on out there in Pets USA. Yesterday’s search yielded Raise a Green Dog (RAGD), a site that addresses eco-friendly advice and products of how your dog can live the healthiest, happiest and longest life possible. Click away and you will find everything from dog products, food, clothing, grooming & cleanup, etc. In addition the site addresses the 3-R’s process – reduce, reuse and recycle when it comes to pet care. 3-R suggestions: When buying products for your dogs take into consideration the amount of packaging associated with the product. If you are looking to buy a new collar or leash, donate the old one to a local rescue or shelter.

Heads Up: Leslie May, RADG’s founder will be featured in the upcoming May 2011 issue of Dog Fancy’s Natural Dog. The article entitled “Reduce Your Dog’s Waste Pawprint” addresses how to dispose of your dog’s #2 (a.k.a. dog doo, dog poo, etc.) in the most eco-friendly way possible. An area of focus in the article is the use of biodegradable bags in waste removal.

My closing thought: I know you can google and find numerous carbon footprint calculators. You can even google and find a carbon paw-print calculator for your dog’s air or car travel. However, I finally uncovered that there is one thing you cannot find on google – a dog waste pawprint calculator. Sounds like a business opportunity, given there are over 77 million dogs in America. What do you think?

8 comments:

  1. My dog is of the normal, human-like variety; 30 LBS of fit, nutritionally focused, non-reproductive bitch. Very eco-friendly, making neat little piles in the yard, and farting little. My brother-in-law, however, has three Great Danes and a Lab...all of them drooling, crapping, and filling the air with methane. The equivalent of a fleet of Hummer H1's in a world focusing on Prius and Sentra. I plan to pass the RADG link on to him; tho I suspect it will do little good. (He drives a Ram Hemi as well.) Such is America: Some will lead, some will follow, and most will ignore...

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  2. Given the size of my dog at 115lbs I don't even want to think about that lifetime of waste. I would feel too guilty so just won't think about it :)

    While you're at it though, what about diapers?

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  3. Very interesting! The ideas of dogs and their role in society over the past 10 years is an interesting discussion. I was at a grand opening for a winery the other week and learned that bringing pets in to weddings is a growing niche. eg. hotels/wedding venues that support pets. Very interesting. :)

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  4. Wow Jackie, what a visualization. I know here in the hood, the carriage rides have a bucket behind their horses, but sometimes they miss which is quite annoying given they no longer water down the streets in the summer. Thank you everyone for your comments.

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  5. I must say Jim, you always bring up such interesting topics. There has been a big discussion here in my city as to whether grocery stores should stop putting groceries in plastic bags totally. There was an uprising because so many people reuse them for their pet's waste pickup.
    Teri

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  6. Interesting topic, Jim and it's nice to see companies pushing for green measures in having a dog. I wonder if a similar approach is being looked at for cat owners as well. Granted, compared to the sizes of some of the dogs people have commented on here, their waste output is significantly lower. However, it would be nice to see some green alternatives being offered.

    I know, for example, in Waterloo, Ontario, the city actually collects cat litter as part of their recycling waste. In fact, they even collect bones and other waste most cities still expect residents to throw out, rather than recycle.

    It would also be nice to see if pet food companies are looking into using sustainable sources for food - that is, relying on farming practices which have a minimal impact on the environment.

    In any case, interesting food for thought, Jim. Thanks for pointing it out.

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  7. Hi Jim - thanks so much for mentioning our blog - Raise A Green Dog! Have a happy, healthy, green dog day :)

    Woofs, Johann and thanks from Mum, Leslie

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  8. I'm fortunate that my apartment building has a thing outside that looks like a birdhouse but it is a trashcan and three rolls of recyclable poo bags. Love it!

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