Tuesday, April 19, 2011

Section 154

Blink:

I just read that on this day back in 1995, the Supreme Court ruled that alcohol content could be listed on beer labels, overturning a 1935 law which had prohibited it. Makes me want to fly out to Cleveland and check out Section 154 in Progressive Field.

Read On:
Earlier in the month I addressed wine consumption in the U.S. I thought it would be a good time to check out beer consumption, since I have been reading numerous articles about the rise of brew pubs and microbreweries. No surprise, beer is America’s most popular alcoholic beverage, accounting for approximately 85% of all alcoholic beverages sold in the United States – generating annual retail sales close to $92 billion. Beer consumption statistics are all over the map, but it is estimated that on the average we consume an estimated 85 liters per year which is equivalent to a little over 22 gallons or 180 pints. Beer drinking is male dominated; men account for 80% of the volume consumed.


So why do I want to go to Progressive Field in Cleveland? Delaware North, a leading contract management company, just opened this year a new Spirits of Ohio stand after extensive testing. The stand is located in Section 154 of the lower deck behind home plate. All of the craft beers are made in the Buckeye State; they range in price from $6.75 to $29.75. That’s correct; a 22- ounce
Hoppin’ Frog Bodacious Black and Tan is $29.75. Too expensive for your tastes? You could always settle for a 22-ounce bottle of Hippie IPA for $19.75 or Brew Kettle’s 4 C’s Pale Ale for $15.75.

I will pass on a beer. I just want to check out the alcohol content on the labels, then head over to Your Dad’s Beer located in Section 119 for a 12-ounce can of Blatz for $4.50. Still an expensive beer when I factor in airfare, hotel, rental car, parking, my ticket, one hot dog and one baseball cap. Anyone care to join me?

8 comments:

  1. Jimmy,

    You hit a sore spot with this one. The prices of food, drink and other items at major league parks is outrageous.

    At Fenway Park "Premium" beer (Sam Adams) cost $8.50 for a 16oz cup. Regular beer (Bud) costs $7.50. A slice of pizza costs $4.00. A sub (hoagie)costs $9.00. Parking costs $30.00...if you can find it. Hats, T-Shirts, etc. are off the wall. The cost to attend a game, for a family of four, starts at about $200.00 and goes into 5 figures...if you want to sit in the Monster seats.

    The concept of gouging a captive audience cheapens and diminishes the product. As the boomers age, their replacements will not be able to afford the prices charged and attendance will decline.

    Advice for those charging $29.75 for a beer today, keep your day job, because the demand won't be there tomorrow.

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  2. Turner Field in ATL has a few craft beer stands as well. Sweetwater Brewery is a small brewer who provides a nice selection of interesting beers. Overall, baseball parks have done a good job of tying in something other than Budweiser. Robert's comments about "gouging" the patron holds true at some parks, but not all. How about movie theaters? They are the worst!

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  3. I have to say I love a couple things about a good craft brew. Microbrewers make beer because they love to do it. They create beer flavors and aromas that have substance, not a consistently bland commodity that the big three beer companies sell today. They care about the product they put out, and it shows. Also, these beer brewers are the underdogs, trying to carve out a little niche in the multi-billion dolalr industry, and that is something that I respect. Personally I would rather shell out $10 or $12 for a decent brew in a brewhouse that has a passion for their product than pay 4 bucks for a Bud Light at the local watering hole.

    ...And there is my rant for the day.

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  4. JIM.....THE CONCESSIONS AT MAJOR LEAGUE PARKS ARE OBSCENE/IMMORAL/OUTRAGEOUS/RAPISTS & OTHERWISE INDECENT. BUT AS THE WISE MAN ONCE SAID: "A SUCKER IS BORN EVERY MINUTE". THAT WILL BE THE DAY WHEN I PAY $29.75 FOR A BOTTLE OF F-----G BEER.
    GREG LITZ

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  5. Thank you for your comments everyone. At this rate. families are going to have to take out loans to enjoy sporting events live, especially if kids want to spice up their wardrobes. TV for me still remains a viable option.,

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  6. Beer has changed so much over the years - it has become a connoisseur taste experience and the "value" and price has gone up. Where is the next 5-star hot dog...

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  7. I proudly represent part of the 20% female beer drinking crowd. Though, $30 for a beer at a stadium?? Forget it.

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